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The Demise of the Nation-State?


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In The Guardian, Rana Dasgupta has a lengthly piece that examines the historical rise and present-day decline of the nation-state. The nation-state, writes Dasgupta, was suitable for an era when national governments could exercise some degree of control over their economies. But now that national governments are beholden to a global market, they are failing in their stated aims of ensuring national stability and protecting the welfare of their citizens. Dasgupta argues that we urgently need to develop a new system that transcends the nation-state—a system of interstate alliances and global taxation. Here’s an excerpt from the piece:

The most momentous development of our era, precisely, is the waning of the nation state: its inability to withstand countervailing 21st-century forces, and its calamitous loss of influence over human circumstance. National political authority is in decline, and, since we do not know any other sort, it feels like the end of the world. This is why a strange brand of apocalyptic nationalism is so widely in vogue. But the current appeal of machismo as political style, the wall-building and xenophobia, the mythology and race theory, the fantastical promises of national restoration – these are not cures, but symptoms of what is slowly revealing itself to all: nation states everywhere are in an advanced state of political and moral decay from which they cannot individually extricate themselves.

Why is this happening? In brief, 20th-century political structures are drowning in a 21st-century ocean of deregulated finance, autonomous technology, religious militancy and great-power rivalry. Meanwhile, the suppressed consequences of 20th-century recklessness in the once-colonised world are erupting, cracking nations into fragments and forcing populations into post-national solidarities: roving tribal militias, ethnic and religious sub-states and super-states. Finally, the old superpowers’ demolition of old ideas of international society – ideas of the “society of nations” that were essential to the way the new world order was envisioned after 1918 – has turned the nation-state system into a lawless gangland; and this is now producing a nihilistic backlash from the ones who have been most terrorised and despoiled.

Image via The Guardian.