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"Stuart Hall and the Rise of Cultural Studies"


#1

At the New Yorker website, Hua Hsu reflects on the legacy of Jamaican-born scholar Stuart Hall, who is widely credited with founding the academic discipline of cultural studies. Hall described the discipline, which has sometimes been accused of being superficial and insufficiently rigorous, as “experience lived, experience interpreted, experience defined.” Hsu examines Hall’s work via three books of his uncollected writing, including a memoir, recently published by Duke University Press. Here’s an excerpt from the piece:

Broadly speaking, cultural studies is not one arm of the humanities so much as an attempt to use all of those arms at once. It emerged in England, in the nineteen-fifties and sixties, when scholars from working-class backgrounds, such as Richard Hoggart and Raymond Williams, began thinking about the distance between canonical cultural touchstones—the music or books that were supposed to teach you how to be civil and well-mannered—and their own upbringings. These scholars believed that the rise of mass communications and popular forms were permanently changing our relationship to power and authority, and to one another. There was no longer consensus. Hall was interested in the experience of being alive during such disruptive times. What is culture, he proposed, but an attempt to grasp at these changes, to wrap one’s head around what is newly possible?

Hall retained faith that culture was a site of “negotiation,” as he put it, a space of give and take where intended meanings could be short-circuited. “Popular culture is one of the sites where this struggle for and against a culture of the powerful is engaged: it is also the stake to be won or lost in that struggle,” he argues. “It is the arena of consent and resistance.” In a free society, culture does not answer to central, governmental dictates, but it nonetheless embodies an unconscious sense of the values we share, of what it means to be right or wrong. Over his career, Hall became fascinated with theories of “reception”—how we decode the different messages that culture is telling us, how culture helps us choose our own identities. He wasn’t merely interested in interpreting new forms, such as film or television, using the tools that scholars had previously brought to bear on literature. He was interested in understanding the various political, economic, or social forces that converged in these media. It wasn’t merely the content or the language of the nightly news, or middlebrow magazines, that told us what to think; it was also how they were structured, packaged, and distributed.

Image of Stuart Hall via caribbean-beat.com.


#2

Alas, the use now of the words decode, package, distribute, remind me of only the bad sociology/vulgar media studies understandings of CS. So i hold my breath anxiously before reading on, if ì do.