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Is Everything You Think You Know About Depression Wrong?


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The Guardian has an excerpt from journalist Johann Hari’s forthcoming book Lost Connections: Uncovering the Real Causes of Depression—and the Unexpected Solutions. As the excerpt explains, Hari himself has battled depression for most of his adult life, and after years of taking anti-depressants he became skeptical of the medical mentality that treated depression as primarily a chemical imbalance. So he spoke to dissenting doctors and depression sufferers around the work and arrived at an alternative explanation: depression is caused by social isolation and a lack of purpose in one’s life—in other words, by external factors, not by brain chemicals. Here’s a snippet from Hari’s piece:

I started to research my book, Lost Connections: Uncovering The Real Causes of Depression – and the Unexpected Solutions, because I was puzzled by two mysteries. Why was I still depressed when I was doing everything I had been told to do? I had identified the low serotonin in my brain, and I was boosting my serotonin levels – yet I still felt awful. But there was a deeper mystery still. Why were so many other people across the western world feeling like me? Around one in five US adults are taking at least one drug for a psychiatric problem. In Britain, antidepressant prescriptions have doubled in a decade, to the point where now one in 11 of us drug ourselves to deal with these feelings. What has been causing depression and its twin, anxiety, to spiral in this way? I began to ask myself: could it really be that in our separate heads, all of us had brain chemistries that were spontaneously malfunctioning at the same time?

… So, what is really going on? When I interviewed social scientists all over the world – from São Paulo to Sydney, from Los Angeles to London – I started to see an unexpected picture emerge. We all know that every human being has basic physical needs: for food, for water, for shelter, for clean air. It turns out that, in the same way, all humans have certain basic psychological needs. We need to feel we belong. We need to feel valued. We need to feel we’re good at something. We need to feel we have a secure future. And there is growing evidence that our culture isn’t meeting those psychological needs for many – perhaps most – people. I kept learning that, in very different ways, we have become disconnected from things we really need, and this deep disconnection is driving this epidemic of depression and anxiety all around us.

Image via The Guardian.